“Weak-days.” “Weak-ends.”

“I feel like myself, strong and weak at once – allowed, at least for a little while, to be both.”
― Veronica Roth

What I live by, and do on my “weak-days,” until my “weak-ends.”
(A summary)

When life gets too complicated.
I go simple.

When a buffalo sees a storm coming.
They walk towards it.

When a plane hits turbulence.
It slows down.

“For moderate or extreme turbulence, pilots are trained to slow the aircraft down… This protects the aircraft in that if it encounters extreme turbulence, the aircraft wings will essentially “stall” before the aircraft is damaged.”

When driving in extreme cold and icy conditions:

  • Operate your vehicle slowly and smoothly, including brakes, steering, acceleration and changing gears.
  • Gently accelerate the vehicle using low revs and shift to a higher gear as quickly as possible.
  • Maintain a greater braking distance between your car and the vehicle in front of you.
  • If the car begins to skid, try not to panic. Steer gently into it. Do not take your hands off the steering wheel nor slam on the brakes.

When cleaning a room. Start with the stinky stuff. Then move to the dirty stuff. Then get the big stuff. Then put everything else where it belongs. Then the room is ready to be wiped down, dusted, vacuumed…etc.
*expect to repeat this metaphor forever. Nothing stays clean*

One. Task. At. A. Mother. _______. Time.

Finally. When an electronic device overheats. It shuts itself off.


Metaphors help ingrain abstract principles and truths in an understandable and memorable way. I’m obsessed with a good metaphor.


I’ve probably heard, read, experienced thousands of metaphors about; how to heal, connect with self, stay true, tackle challenges, remember priorities, lean into changes, love, blah blah blah… those are just a few that have actually helped me. Time and time again. I live by them. *when I remember to ;)*

But on my “weak” days. When metaphors don’t work because “I” am below 30% capacity… what I call: Aubrey in survival mode

THIS is what I actually do.

-I focus on being nice to my kids. *and others. Mostly my kids though*

-I drink water.

-I make myself go outside.

-I take a nap(s)

-I talk to someone, (in someway) so I’m “seen” that day.

-I try to do as many personal hygiene things I have energy for.

-I eat something(s)

-I put anything in my eyes/brain/ears/heart that is beautiful.

I.e. art, poetry, music, movie, tv show, pictures…
(my fav one)

-I admit I’m feeling “weak.” *I list how its sucking, why, in what ways, am I Mad? Sad? Stressed? Overwhelmed? Upset? Sick? Tired? Frustrated? Jealous? A little of all?* On scratch paper I write a vent session, or ferociously type it in my phone. I get the poison out. Then I throw it away or delete it. It needs no structure or format. (When I was 16, I used to write my “angry entries” in red pen. How embarrassing!…but effective. Haha!) Sometimes it’s just phrases and words. Sometimes I’m so upset I’ll purposefully write big and crooked words on top of each other because that is how it feels inside of me. It’s cathartic.


What do you do when you’re feeling “weak?”

What are some of your favorite metaphors you actually “live” by.

What are your basics when you are in “survival mode?”

I’m so curious. So thank you in advance for your messages/comments.

Love in.

Love out.

-Aubrey

1 thought on ““Weak-days.” “Weak-ends.”

  1. I love your writing. I’m impressed with the many, quite articulate quotes you use in your blog. Those additions to your writings do not compare to the beautiful way you think, and put those thoughts to words.
    Here’s a funny moment. I wanted to say something about the nerve being pinched around my knee. But, “knee nerve” just didn’t sound right.
    But then, that’s why there’s a “k” in the word knee. So that, if you have to say knee nerve, All you do is sound out the “k”, and it sounds a lot better.
    Ká-nē nerve.
    See what I mean?
    Love out

    Like

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